Guide for Authors

Manuscript should be original, unpublished and not being submitted for publication elsewhere. Manuscript based on incomplete data, limited to local importance, and results routine and periodical experiments will not normally be considered for publication.

Author’s Information

Manuscripts for submission must be written in English. Author, whose native language is not English, are strongly advised to have their manuscript checked by an editor. The manuscript should be typed double spaced. After reviewing process, the Editor-in-Chief will inform the author(s) about acceptance, rejection or necessity of revision of the manuscript. The manuscript should be arranged as follows:

1- Format of brief articles and short notes

  • Title page, including name (s), affiliation (s) and present email of author (s)
  • Article title
  • Abstract
  • Keywords
  • Background
  • Objectives (optional)
  • Materials and Methods
  • Results and Discussion (This section can be separated)
  • Conclusion
  • Acknowledgements (If necessary)
  • Footnotes
  • References

 Maximum number of table (or figures) and references is 2 and 20, respectively. The style of main sections needs not to be like full-papers. These articles are 2 to 5 printed pages (about 6 to 12 manuscript pages) in length.

2- Format of Review Articles

  • Title page, including name (s), affiliation and present email of author (s)
  • Article title
  • Abstract
  • Objectives
  • Evidence Acquisition
  • Result
  • Conclusion
  • Acknowledgements (If necessary)
  • Footnotes
  • References

Maximum number of table (or figures) and references is 5 and 80, respectively. Review articles and perspectives covering topics of current interest are welcome and encouraged. Reviews should be concise and no longer than 4-6 printed pages (about 12 to 18 manuscript pages). Reviews manuscripts will also be peer-reviewed.

3- Format of Research Articles (Original Articles)

  • Title page, including name (s), affiliation and email address of author (s)
  • Article title
  • Abstract
  • Background
  • Objectives
  • Materials and Methods
  • Results and Discussion (Advised to separate mentioned section)
  • Conclusion
  • Acknowledgements (If necessary)
  • Footnotes
  • References

These articles should describe new and carefully confirmed findings, and experimental procedures should be given in sufficient detail for others to verify the work.

Each section of article must be prepared as follows:

Title page: Including full title of article, the name(s) of the author(s), their affiliation and the name and phone/fax number of the corresponding author to whom proofs and requests for off prints should be sent.

Article title: A good title briefly introduces the subject and indicates the purpose of the study. Use common names of plants if possible, otherwise include their scientific names. Avoid abbreviations. The recommended length of title is 25 words or less.

Abstract: Should be informative and completely self-explanatory, briefly present the topic, state the scope of the experiments, indicate significant data, and point out major findings and conclusions.

 The abstract should not be more than 400 words for papers and not more than 300 words for short notes, consisting six subjects: background, objectives, method, result, conclusion and keywords, respectively. Abstract should concisely describe the problem being addressed in the paper, how the study was performed, results obtained and what the authors conclude the results. Figures, tables, references and equations should be avoided.

Keywords: Five to seven keywords characterizing the content of the paper can be used, although keyword should not be used in article title.

Background: Should provide a clear statement of the problem, the relevant literature on the subject, and the proposed approach or solution. This section should contain statements about the reasons for doing the work and a concise analysis of the essential background.

Materials and Methods: This section should provide sufficient information and references about the used techniques and materials. Should be complete enough to allow experiments to be repeated. However, only new procedures should be described in detail; previously published procedures should be cited, and important modifications of published procedures should be mentioned briefly.

Results and Discussion: Content of Results should provide full comprehension of the data reported in figures and tables. It should be presented with clarity and precision. The results must be written in past tense when describing findings in author’s experiments.Discussion should underline the significance of the results and place them in the context of previous research. Greatly advised to separate the results and discussion in different section.

Conclusion: Briefly describe result of current research.

Acknowledgements: If necessary.

Footnotes: Includes authors’ contribution, conflict of interest, funding/support.

References: In the text, a reference identified by means of an author’s name should be followed by the date of the reference in parentheses. When there are more than two authors, only the first author’s name should be mentioned, followed by ’et al‘.

When an author had two or more works published during the same year, the reference, should be identified by a lower case letter like ’a‘ and ’b‘ after the date, to distinguish the works, both in the text and in the reference list.

References examples (in text)

Taylor (1995), Mian et al. (2007), Bordoli and Mallarino (1998), (Chege, 1998, Chukwura, 1987a, b, Tijani, 1993, 1995), (Togay et al., 2009).

References should be listed at the end of the paper in alphabetical order by the surnames of authors. Articles in preparation or articles submitted for publication, unpublished observations, personal communications, etc. should not be included in the reference list but can only be mentioned in the article text (e.g., A. Kingori, University of Nairobi, Kenya, personal communication). Authors are fully responsible for the accuracy of the references. Two or more articles by the same author (s) are listed chronologically.

References examples (at the end of article)

Journal Articles

Bordoli, J. M. and A. P. Mallarino. 1998. Deep and shallow banding of phosphorous and potassium as alternatives to broadcast fertilization for no-till corn. Agron. J. 90: 27-33.

 Modhej, A., A. Naderi, Y. Emam, A. Aynehband. and Gh. Normohammadi. 2008. Effects of post-anthesis heat stress and nitrogen levels on grain yield in wheat (T.durum and T. aestivum) genotypes. Int. J. Plant Prod. 2(3):257-268.

Yadav, S. K. 2009. Heavy metals toxicity in plants: An overview on the role of glutathione and phyto-chelatins in heavy metal stress tolerance of plants. South African J. Bot. 76: 167-179.

Articles not in English with English Abstract

Modhej, A. 2009. Effect of terminal heat stress on source limitation and grain yield in bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) genotypes in Khuzestan conditions. Iranian J. Field Crop Sci. 39(1): 89-97. (Abstract in English)

 Books

Fehr, W. R and C. E. Caviness. 1977. Stages of soybean development. Spec. Rep. 80. Iowa Agric. Home Econ. Exp. Iowa State Univ. USA.

Book Equivalents: Numbered bulletins, reports, or special publications

Taylor, B. N. 1995. Guide for the use of the International System of Units (SI). NIST Spec. Pub. No. 811. U.S. Gov. Print. Off. Washington. D. C.

Conference, symposium, or workshop proceedings and transactions

Bailey, S. W. (Ed) 1976. Proc. Int. Clay Conf., Mexico City. 16-23 July 1975. App. Pub. Ltd. Wilmette. IL.

Ramanujam, S. (Ed) 1979. 5th Proc. Int. Wheat Genet. Sym. New Delhi. India. 23-28 Feb. 1978. Indian Soc. Genet. Plant Breeding, Indian Agric. Res. Inst. New Delhi.

Wilkinson, D. (Ed) 1993. 49th Proc. Ann. Corn and Sorghum Ind. Res. Conf. Chicago. IL. 8-9 Dec. 1993. Amer. Seed Trade Assn. Washington, D.C.

Chapters in Books

Gardner, W. H. 1986. Water Content. pp: 493-544. In: Klute A. (Ed) Methods of Soil Analysis: Part 1. 2nd Ed. Agron. Monogr. 9. ASA and SSSA, Madison, WI.

Hodges, T and J. T. Ritchie. 1991. The Ceres-Wheat Phenology Model. pp: 133–141. In: T. Hodges (Ed) Predicting Crop Phenology. CRC Press, Boston.

Dissertations or Theses

Endres, C. 1986. Influence of production practices on yield and morphology of Amaranthus cruentus and Amaranthus hypochondriacus. M.Sc. Thesis. Univ. Arkansas, Fayetteville. USA.

The references writing method used in the journal is APA style.

Advised to authors  for use Endnote software to write article references.

Figures and photographs: Unnecessary 3D figures should be avoided. Dimensions should be appropriate for reduction. They must be prepared in high resolution. Brief but explanatory title must be located under each figure or photograph. They should be numbered with Arabic numerical in order as cited in the text.

Tables: Tables should be self-contained and complementary, but not duplicated, information(s) contained in the text. Tables should be with Arabic numerals in the order in which they are cited in the text. The created tables should have defined cells. Brief but explanatory title must be located above each table.

Scientific Names: Common names of organisms, when first cited should always be accompanied by their complete scientific names in italics (genus, species, attribution and, if appropriate, variety).

 Formulae and Equations: Mathematical formulae must be carefully typed, possibly using the equation editor. When a paper contains several equations, they should be identified with numbers.

Fees and Charges: At present time, JCNS does not receive page charges.

 

*Article format guide

 

Section of Article

Font Type

Font Size

Font Situation

Title of article

Calibri

13

Bold

Name of author (S)

Calibri

12

Bold

Author (S) affiliation

Calibri

11

Italic

Corresponding author email

Segoe UI

10

Normal

Title of every section

Times New Roman

12

Bold

Text of article

Times New Roman

12

Normal

Keywords

Times New Roman

12

Italic

Number of figures

Times New Roman

11

Bold

Title of figures

Times New Roman

11

Normal

Number of table

Times New Roman

11

Bold

Title of table

Times New Roman

11

Normal

Text and numbers in tables

Times New Roman

10

Normal

Number of formulae and

equations

Times New Roman

11

Bold

Title of formulae and

equations

Times New Roman

11

Normal

 

* Page setup

 

Margins (Top, Bottom, Left, Right)

3 cm

Paper

A4 (21 cm×29.7 cm)

Header

2 cm

Footer

1.5 cm

Column Width

6.86 cm

Column Spacing

1.27 cm

With equal column width

 

* File Format: MS Word (.DOC and .DOCX)

* Photographs Format: JPG, JPEG, JPE, JFIF